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October 21, 2021

Hydration for exercise performance

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Hydration is an important foundation habit to support your new functional movement regime. Drinking water pre, during and post workout improves your exercise performance. It affects your strength, endurance and co-ordination. Water cushions joints for ease of movement and helps regulate body temperature. It can also help prevent muscle cramping.  Being hydrated in a general sense is an important recovery practice.

Everyone’s daily water requirement is different. A general guideline is 2 litres per day with another glass for every coffee or alcoholic drink. Your actual requirement will depend on factors such as your weight, the temperature, humidity of the environment and whether your diet is rich in water-dense or salt-dense foods. When you drink enough water your urine will usually be pale yellow.  You will require more water on your exercise days – unfortunately water to re-hydrate post exercise doesn’t count towards your intake goal for the day.

Water tip top one is to build up your liquid intake gradually. A rookie error is trying to achieve too much too soon – you end up spending a lot of time in the bathroom. Aim to increase your water intake by around a third a week, so if you’re currently on around 3 glasses a day try for 4 in your first week, 5 in your second and 7 in your third.  If you feel the liquid is going straight through you it’s possible you’ve been too ambitious, slow down while your body gets used to using the water. 

Water top tip two is to make a water plan. Without structure it’s very easy to get to 4pm and realize you’ve only had two glasses. Start early in the day and make a schedule. For example, if you’re aiming for seven glasses try for one with breakfast, two before 10am, one before 1pm, two before 4pm, one before 6pm. Knowing you have to drink a glass or two of water before you next eat is a good reminder and motivator. You could also consider setting an alarm on your phone. You may need a different plan for weekdays and weekends when your routine is different.

For an easy thing, water-drinking is surprisingly difficult. Not many people drink enough water by accident and it can be challenging to make it a habit. Goals that are mindful, realistic and specific will improve your exercise performance and help you get the best out of the efforts you’re making.

Reference

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/7-health-benefits-of-water

This article provides general health and wellbeing information. It is not intended to be medical or nutritional advice specific to you. Please consult an appropriate healthcare professional, such as your GP, a registered dietitian or nutritionist for any specific concerns.

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Hydration is an important foundation habit to support your new functional movement regime. Drinking water pre, during and post workout improves your exercise performance. It affects your strength, endurance and co-ordination. Water cushions joints for ease of movement and helps regulate body temperature. It can also help prevent muscle cramping.  Being hydrated in a general sense is an important recovery practice.

Everyone’s daily water requirement is different. A general guideline is 2 litres per day with another glass for every coffee or alcoholic drink. Your actual requirement will depend on factors such as your weight, the temperature, humidity of the environment and whether your diet is rich in water-dense or salt-dense foods. When you drink enough water your urine will usually be pale yellow.  You will require more water on your exercise days – unfortunately water to re-hydrate post exercise doesn’t count towards your intake goal for the day.

Water tip top one is to build up your liquid intake gradually. A rookie error is trying to achieve too much too soon – you end up spending a lot of time in the bathroom. Aim to increase your water intake by around a third a week, so if you’re currently on around 3 glasses a day try for 4 in your first week, 5 in your second and 7 in your third.  If you feel the liquid is going straight through you it’s possible you’ve been too ambitious, slow down while your body gets used to using the water. 

Water top tip two is to make a water plan. Without structure it’s very easy to get to 4pm and realize you’ve only had two glasses. Start early in the day and make a schedule. For example, if you’re aiming for seven glasses try for one with breakfast, two before 10am, one before 1pm, two before 4pm, one before 6pm. Knowing you have to drink a glass or two of water before you next eat is a good reminder and motivator. You could also consider setting an alarm on your phone. You may need a different plan for weekdays and weekends when your routine is different.

For an easy thing, water-drinking is surprisingly difficult. Not many people drink enough water by accident and it can be challenging to make it a habit. Goals that are mindful, realistic and specific will improve your exercise performance and help you get the best out of the efforts you’re making.

Reference

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/7-health-benefits-of-water

This article provides general health and wellbeing information. It is not intended to be medical or nutritional advice specific to you. Please consult an appropriate healthcare professional, such as your GP, a registered dietitian or nutritionist for any specific concerns.

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Claire Bellingham

Les Mills Writer / Personal Trainer / Nutritionist

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