June365 LinkedinJune365 InstagramJune365 FacebookJune365 YouTube

October 21, 2021

Sleep smart

Share Via:

Linkedin
Facebook

Foundation habit number three is sleep. It builds on top of functional movement and hydration to progress you on the upwards spiral to better health.

Being sleep deprived has become a status symbol for being busy and important. But long-term sleep deprivation is a significant health risk. It’s associated with a variety of serious health conditions such as heart disease, obesity, diabetes and dementia. It’s also associated with an increased risk of depression and anxiety. So most of the problems that sleep deprivation contributes to then further interrupt sleep. 

Sleep affects cognitive health too. Adequate sleep leads to better processing and retention of information. Healthy sleep patterns are also related to social and emotional intelligence – people getting adequate sleep are better able to recognize other people’s emotions and expressions and show emotional empathy. 

Top tip one is to set a weekday bedtime then structure your habits to meet it most days. Getting ready for bed can be tiring, the closer you leave it to bedtime the harder it is. Start the close-down process early, for example after sundown don’t start any new tasks. Put your energy into final organizing and then winding down.

Top tip two is to track your sleep success.  Use a Sleep App or manual diary to check you’re meeting your goals.  Greater awareness will help you make the changes you need to get the results you want.  

The less variation you have in your bedtime, the healthier you will be. Like water intake, sleep is often a discipline that can require goals and accountability to achieve.

A sleep-deprived body is like a car with a flat tire. The car is running but it’s moving with less capability and power. The longer it operates in that condition the more likely there will be damage to the car and potentially others around it. Sometimes sleep deprivation is unavoidable for periods of time, but often a late bedtime is just a bad habit. If you can problem-solve your way to a little more sleep you’ll find yourself empowered to further improve your sleep and all your other healthy habits.

Reference:

www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/features/lack-of-sleep-weight-gain

This article provides general health and wellbeing information. It is not intended to be medical or nutritional advice specific to you. Please consult an appropriate healthcare professional, such as your GP, a registered dietitian or nutritionist for any specific concerns.

Subscription

Related Articles

How to create more successful workdays.

How to create more successful workdays.

One of the most important parts of one’s job is feeling valued.

Learn More >

How to create positive shifts in your work relationships.

How to create positive shifts in your work relationships.

Healthy relationships are so very important, but sometimes we as a species can find such valued bonds difficult to maintain under increased stress and pressures.

Learn More >

How physical health & oxygen boost can impact your performance at work.

How physical health & oxygen boost can impact your performance at work.

There are many cognitive benefits to exercise that can positively impact your working day, and by not being active in the day, you’re not performing at your full potential.

Learn More >

Linkedin
Facebook
Facebook

Wellness & Wellbeing

Sleep smart

Never miss a post!

Enter your email address
to subscribe.

Foundation habit number three is sleep. It builds on top of functional movement and hydration to progress you on the upwards spiral to better health.

Being sleep deprived has become a status symbol for being busy and important. But long-term sleep deprivation is a significant health risk. It’s associated with a variety of serious health conditions such as heart disease, obesity, diabetes and dementia. It’s also associated with an increased risk of depression and anxiety. So most of the problems that sleep deprivation contributes to then further interrupt sleep. 

Sleep affects cognitive health too. Adequate sleep leads to better processing and retention of information. Healthy sleep patterns are also related to social and emotional intelligence – people getting adequate sleep are better able to recognize other people’s emotions and expressions and show emotional empathy. 

Top tip one is to set a weekday bedtime then structure your habits to meet it most days. Getting ready for bed can be tiring, the closer you leave it to bedtime the harder it is. Start the close-down process early, for example after sundown don’t start any new tasks. Put your energy into final organizing and then winding down.

Top tip two is to track your sleep success.  Use a Sleep App or manual diary to check you’re meeting your goals.  Greater awareness will help you make the changes you need to get the results you want.  

The less variation you have in your bedtime, the healthier you will be. Like water intake, sleep is often a discipline that can require goals and accountability to achieve.

A sleep-deprived body is like a car with a flat tire. The car is running but it’s moving with less capability and power. The longer it operates in that condition the more likely there will be damage to the car and potentially others around it. Sometimes sleep deprivation is unavoidable for periods of time, but often a late bedtime is just a bad habit. If you can problem-solve your way to a little more sleep you’ll find yourself empowered to further improve your sleep and all your other healthy habits.

Reference:

www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/features/lack-of-sleep-weight-gain

This article provides general health and wellbeing information. It is not intended to be medical or nutritional advice specific to you. Please consult an appropriate healthcare professional, such as your GP, a registered dietitian or nutritionist for any specific concerns.

Linkedin
Facebook
Facebook
Author photo

Claire Bellingham

Les Mills Writer / Personal Trainer / Nutritionist

Read more from

Claire Bellingham

Subscription

Expand your knowledge of June365 by staying up to date with our goings on.

Every month we put out a Newsletter with great, tips, tricks and tid-bits just for you.

JUNE'S RECOMMENDATION

EDITOR'S PICK

More related articles

Go Top